DIABETES AND HEART DISEASE GO HAND IN HAND

The American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association along with industry leaders are proud to announce a groundbreaking collaborative initiative to improve public awareness and understanding of the critical link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Through this initiative, our goal is to help people with type 2 diabetes reduce their risk of disability and death due to heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular events. 

Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease than people without diabetes.


In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has nearly tripled.For adults over age 60, having type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease shortens life expectancy by an average of 12 years. Cardiovascular disease, such as heart disease, heart failure, heart attacks and strokes, is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, and a major cause of disability.

To comprehensively combat this public health issue, the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association have joined forces supported by founding sponsors Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly Alliance, and Novo Nordisk. Additional support for this initiative is provided by national sponsor, Sanofi.

  • What is diabetes

    What is diabetes?

    Diabetes is medical condition that causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than normal. This is also called hyperglycemia. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes.

    If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels.

    Familiarize yourself with more in-depth information about diabetes.

    Risk Factors and Solutions

    What can you do to help prevent or manage serious complications of type 2 diabetes, like cardiovascular disease?

    While there are some factors that are beyond a person's control, many people with diabetes are able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular disease through the following actions:

    Talk to your doctor at your next appointment about your cardiovascular disease risk and ways to manage both conditions.

    Make healthy food choices, including fiber-rich whole grains, lean meats and deeply-colored fruits and vegetables.

    Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day.

    Monitor your blood glucose, blood pressure, cholesterol and weight.

    Quit smoking.

    Learn more about living long and healthful lives with diabetes.

     What are we doing to help?

    What are we doing to help?

    Together we commit to educating patients, training healthcare providers and supporting quality improvement measures for clinics and hospitals that treat people with type 2 diabetes, who are at risk for cardiovascular disease.

    In the coming months, we will be providing more about the initiative along with practical tools and valuable resources.

AHA-ADA Diabetes Initiative Infographic

      Transcript of Infographic:

       The Link Between Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

       Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

  • Diabetes is a condition that causes blood glucose (blood sugar) to rise to above normal levels.1
    • More than 30 million Americans have diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes.2
    • Cardiovascular disease describes a range of conditions that affect the heart, including heart attacks and strokes.3

      The Connection Between Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

  • Adults with diabetes are 2-4 times more likely to have cardiovascular disease than people without diabetes.4
  • The longer you live with diabetes, the higher your cardiovascular disease risk.
  • People with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Additional risk factors include obesity and a lack of physical activity.5
  • Diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels.6
  • Even when blood glucose is well-managed, there is still an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.5

      Knowing the Impact of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

  • Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of disability among people with diabetes.7
  • Nearly one in every seven healthcare dollars is spent directly treating diabetes and its complications.8
  • For adults over age 60, having type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease shortens life expectancy by an average of 12 years.9
  • Cost per year. 10

      Managing Diabetes and Reducing The Risk of Cardiovascular Disease11,12

  • Talk to your doctor about your cardiovascular disease risk and ways to manage both conditions.
  • Make healthy food choices, including fiber-rich whole grains, lean meats and deeply-colored fruits and vegetables.
  • Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day. *
  • Monitor your blood glucose, blood pressure, cholesterol and weight.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Deal with stress in a healthy manner, such as meditation.

     Learn much more at www.heart.org/aboutdiabetes.

  *Consult a physician before starting a new exercise routine.

     References

  1. American Heart Association. “About Diabetes.” Published August 2015.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report. Published 2017.
  3. American Diabetes Association. “What is Cardiovascular Disease?” Updated May 2017.
  4. The Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration. “Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, andrisk of vascular disease.” Lancet 2010.
  5. American Diabetes Association. “Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes.” Published August 2015.
  6. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. “Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke.” Published February 2017.
  7. National Institutes of Health. Diabetes in America, 3rd ed. Bethesda, MD, NIH Pub No. 17-1468, 2017.
  8. American Diabetes Association. “Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S. in 2017.” Diabetes Care. 2018.
  9. University of Cambridge. “Combination of diabetes and heart disease substantially reduces life expectancy.” Published July 2015.
  10. American Heart Association. Cardiovascular Disease: A Costly Burden for America. 2017.
  11. American Heart Association. “Living Healthy with Diabetes.” Published August 2015.
  12. American Heart Association. “3 Tips to Manage Stress.” Published February 2018.

     

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